Codependents and Break-ups

When a relationship breaks up, it is never easy. Feelings naturally run high and emotions can be overwhelming. How quickly one gets back on track depends a lot on the person. When that person is a codependent, it can be a lot worse. Codependents in relationships have an object of codependency to whom they are attached and fixated on. I have previously written on the sacrifice and martyrdom from codependents that keep their object in place.

This controlling measure is generally tolerated by a partner who is willing to take. A perfectly dysfunctional arrangement. What happens, however, when the ‘object’ is no longer there? The sacrifice has nowhere to go. Anyone reading this will know that it is very difficult to give inwardly to self. The self-esteem void that caused the codependency in the first place will ensure this is unlikely to happen. Instead, codependents are more likely to jump to the next relationship fairly quickly looking for a new ‘object’ and to satisfy their need to give. This leaves them open to ‘takers’ and at a time when they might be vulnerable and before a break-up has been properly processed. Often this need to find a new relationship quickly is based firmly on a real fear of being alone, something that codependents will do their best to avoid. Alone, they might feel confused, lack purpose and feel depressed.

In my experience in treating codependents that find themselves alone, I often see feelings of guilt, self-blame and an overwhelming sense of responsibility for the break-up: “I could have done more”, “What did I do wrong?” are statements and questions I often hear. Sometimes, they cannot believe that it was just the wrong one. Is there a solution? If one isn’t found then the pattern will probably repeat itself.

The only way to really move forward is to deal with the issue that caused the problem in the first place. This often means reframing past events and healing the shame and guilt from the past. The very factors that dictate that love and control cannot co-exist. I take my clients back to this critical time metaphorically using inner child therapy, and non-dominant handwriting. This allows the client’s inner world to be investigated. Characters can be added to challenge old thinking patterns and cognitive restructuring can take place. Additional to this, it is essential to improve self-esteem in the present, otherwise,  the pattern will be repeated time and time again.

4 comments

  1. Reblogged this on Dr Nicholas Jenner PsyD MA and commented:

    In my experience in treating codependents that find themselves alone, I often see feelings of guilt, self-blame and an overwhelming sense of responsibility for the break-up: “I could have done more”, “What did I do wrong?” are statements and questions I often hear.

    Like

  2. Hi Dr. Thank you so much for posting this. I read your article and had AHA moment. I felt that I was reading about myself via your article. I did the test as well and I am a CO-DEPENDANT. I had always this notion that I am independent, self made and what not. I never could understand why my fear of being alone took over and why some would even consider me being over bearing. GOsh! I don’t know what to do next. Are there any future steps that I can take personally to be better?

    Angie

    Like

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